Eugene Kaspersky warns all assets are digitally vulnerable

By May, 2017 August 31st, 2017 ICT, Infrastructure
Critical infrastructure like power grids are at risk of cyber attacks because of the 'Internet of Things', according to Eugene Kaspersky.

Kaspersky Lab CEO Eugene Kaspersky. Image: CeBIT Australia/flickr

Eugene Kaspersky, chairman and chief executive officer of internet security company Kaspersky Lab, has offered his highly sought-after thoughts on the state of Australia’s cybersecurity.

Speaking at CeBIT Australia 2017 in Sydney on 23rd May, Mr Kaspersky was frank about the problems that Australian governments and locally-based companies face when trying to protect their crucial assets – saying that due to the so-called ‘Internet of Things’, everything is vulnerable.

Using the electrical grid as an example, Mr Kaspersky illustrated the grim possibility of a cyberattack on critical infrastructure, calling it a worst case scenario.

“The internet of things is more vulnerable and brings more security problems,” Mr Kaspersky said.

In what he called ‘cyber sabotage attacks’ on power grids, he said if it don’t have electricity, that’s the “end of civilisation”.

“You can’t live without electricity. So when there’s a blackout, we still have some juice in the generator, but then the diesel is off. Then your iPhone battery is off but then it doesn’t matter because your mobile operator ran out of diesel hours ago, so it’s back to horses,” Mr Kaspersky said.

He also used the blackout on the North American east coast in 2003 as a cyberattack scenario, where it was revealed that it was a so-called ‘zombie’ attack where the grid was infected with a worm that makes the critical digital equipment appear to be functioning but actually isn’t.

But another more devastating scenario was an attack on the Ukraine power grid, where attackers switched off the power and wiped all the data on the computer systems.

“As a result it wasn’t possible to restart the system to get control back,” Mr Kaspersky said.

“So the power companies had to physically send engineers to start the manual control on the grid. They were lucky because they still had old equipment. I have heard that the new generation power grid equipment doesn’t have manual power override,” he said.

Other thought bubbles from Mr Kaspersky

He also warned that users of the computer operating system Linux will experience a surge in potential cyberattacks due to the Internet of Things.

And finally, Mr Kaspersky has obviously been doing his homework about Australia. In jest, he asked why is Sydney building a new airport?

“The old was [one] good enough. I don’t want to spend a couple of hours in traffic if you move it too far away,” Mr Kaspersky said.

Filming begins on Godzilla vs Kong on the Gold Coast as Queensland government ramps up excitement for millions of dollars in tourism income.

Godzilla vs Kong rolls cameras in QLD

| Entertainment, State | No Comments
Sunshine State expecting roaring tourism returns.
Noushin Shabab and Negar Shabab, being some of the top cybersecurity gurus of their age, share their thoughts on fixing Australia's digital talent shortage.

5 Minutes With… Noushin Shabab and Negar Shabab, Cybersecurity Twins

| 5 Minutes With... | No Comments
How should Australia fix the cybersecurity talent shortage of the next generation? Find out here!
After Malcolm Turnbull's dramatic exit, now is Prime Minister Scott Morrison's opportunity to rewrite the rulebook for the election and unite the party.

PM ScoMo: same pitch, new salesman

| Analysis, Federal | No Comments
New leader’s great opportunity after Turnbull hits a dead end.
After, the duel-citizenship-induced bi-election of July 2018, the rules have changed for Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull and Opposition Leader Bill Shorten.

After by-election, leadership debate will roar again

| Analysis, Federal | No Comments
'Super Saturday' fallout to haunt PM until next federal election.
GovNews Newsletter

Stay informed with GovNews...

Gain valuable insights into the latest news, 5 Minutes With, up-coming events and government concepts and initiatives exclusive to eNews.

Only use your corporate email address to sign up. Personal emails (e.g. gmail, yahoo, hotmail, live etc…) will be removed.

You will need to confirm your subscription. Check your junk folder if you have not received a confirmation.